Posted 35 minutes ago

Refueling of an SNC-1 at NAS Corpus Christi, 1942

Posted 36 minutes ago

A U.S. Navy SNC-1 in September 1943

Posted 40 minutes ago

ML-KNIL Martin 166 bombers over Malaya in January 1942.

Posted 43 minutes ago

centreforaviation:

Dutch CW-21 fighters in flight, 1941. [700x398]

Posted 47 minutes ago
Posted 48 minutes ago
Posted 50 minutes ago
xplanes:

“In a way, the P-61 was unofficially credited with the last Allied air kill of World War 2. Unofficial in that the enemy aircraft - a Japanese Nakajima Ki-44 - was reportedly in evasive maneuvers after having encountered an American P-61, its guns blazing on the Nakajima fighter.
The enemy fighter flew defensively just feet above the waves and eventually crashed itself along the surface of the ocean, ending the life of the pilot and his mount in a fiery explosion. The P-61 in question was a P-61B-2 aptly-named “Lady in the Dark” and under the control of Lieutenant Robert W. Clyde. The event occurred sometime between August 14th and 15th. If credited, the kill would have been accomplished without a single shot being fired..” (via)

xplanes:

“In a way, the P-61 was unofficially credited with the last Allied air kill of World War 2. Unofficial in that the enemy aircraft - a Japanese Nakajima Ki-44 - was reportedly in evasive maneuvers after having encountered an American P-61, its guns blazing on the Nakajima fighter.

The enemy fighter flew defensively just feet above the waves and eventually crashed itself along the surface of the ocean, ending the life of the pilot and his mount in a fiery explosion. The P-61 in question was a P-61B-2 aptly-named “Lady in the Dark” and under the control of Lieutenant Robert W. Clyde. The event occurred sometime between August 14th and 15th. If credited, the kill would have been accomplished without a single shot being fired..” (via)

Posted 51 minutes ago

toocatsoriginals:

RAF Spitfire - “Mod. XXX” - Toting Beer Casks to Soldiers in Normandy 

British breweries donated free beer to soldiers during World War II, but just after D-Day, there was no room made to ship it over the English Channel. Spitfire mechanics and pilots worked together to modify pylons to carry either specially-modified drop tanks or beer casks to deliver brews to the troops. Official missions were stopped when the UK Tax Office warned brewers they would get in trouble for exporting beer abroad without paying taxes, but pilots still found ways to get beer where it was needed…

via Urban Ghosts and Spitfire Site

Posted 3 days ago

Ju 390

Posted 3 days ago

Rear view with extended Trapoklappe ramp